tuck. pin. done: no-sew loveseat slipcover in 30

     I have a sweet little loveseat that sits in front of the dining room window. This warm, sunny corner is everyone's favorite spot. Unfortunately, the dogs are included in that group. Our furry girls believe this loveseat to be their lookout post. A place to watch over our house, to protect their territory... the sentries' headquarters.
 Consequently, the loveseat is stained and soiled. It stinks. I cannot stand it one. more. day.
     I will boldly admit that I am NO seamstress. I can make a rather nice duvet cover using two flat sheets or make simple drapes out of a tablecloth, but those are straight lines. No pattern. No real sewing.
     I decided to make a no-sew slipcover out of a couple of large, canvas drop-cloths purchased for another project. Yep... that's right. They are the very same ones you buy at Home Depot to cover your furniture in a different way.
     My family was skeptical. They've forgotten who they're living with... my super-power is saving money while making our home look FAB!
     The loveseat is a tight-backed, split, square-cushioned piece with rolled arms. I wanted it to look like the cushions were separately covered without cutting the canvas again. This way, the fabric can be removed, thrown in the wash and put back on. The entire thing is three pieces. After vacuuming and spot cleaning the existing cover, I jumped right in...

Here's how to have a brand new loveseat before supper:
     The drop-cloths I purchased have a seam in the center and are 9 ft. x 12 ft., 8 oz. weight. The label states that they're heavy-duty, washable and reusable.
     Begin by cutting one large cloth in half length-wise along the seam. Take half of the cut cloth and reserve for another project. Cut the remaining piece in half again, horizontally. This will be the two side and arm pieces.
    For the time being, I used large-headed straight pins... the ones that look like they have a large pearl on the end. If you're using these, be careful not to point pin upward. I tried to keep them from being visible. Corkscrew-type upholstery tacks would have more staying power. (I'll pick some up later.)
     Remove seat cushions. Begin with the outside arm first. Wrap the outside arm, making sure the bottom is straight. After pinning the underside bottom, smooth the fabric upward and pin under outside arm to secure.
     Lay fabric over the top of arm, making sure to pull it tight. Tuck into inside arm, between arm and seat, by the springs. Don't be afraid of shoving it down beside the springs. Keep it taut and tucked deep so it won't come out. This is the key to success! For arm front, I made a fan-like pattern, pinning and folding around the shape of the arm.
     After tightly wrapping and pinning the sides, I replaced the seat cushions and draped the second, uncut drop cloth over the center. I began by lining up the top of the cloth to the bottom back of the loveseat. In my house, the back won't be seen, but I wanted it to look neat. Pin the bottom back in a couple of key spot to keep it from sliding, then move to the seat back and cushions.
     The seam of the drop-cloth served as a center line for pushing down deep in between the back and seat cushions. That gave it a more fitted look. This will also prevent it from coming off. Tightly tuck fabric around each side of seat cushions and between back cushions. Lastly, spread it in far under the front of seat cushion, smoothing out and tucking into springs.
     The original did not have a skirt, but I had a bit of folded fabric remaining. Not wanting to cut it off, I took a little creative license with the design. The whole thing was finished in approximately thirty minutes. 
Tuck. Pin. Done... It's beautiful and clean. Sigh.

Comments

  1. that's a real compliment coming from a seamstress of your stature. thanks ;)

    ReplyDelete
  2. now when are you available to help me cover a loveseat ??

    ReplyDelete
  3. Vicki, I wrote this so I won't have to... you CAN do it! ha

    ReplyDelete
  4. Oh my gosh ...oh me oh my !!!! I have been all over bloggy land, lookin' for a way to do mine..!!! BUT they are ALL sooooo complicated ie; measuring , sewing the darn things....I have a dropcloth that i bought about A YEAR AGO !!!! U R TRULY AN INSPIRATION !!! thank U xxxxx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Did it work? I really hope my instructions are clear enough... comments?

      Delete
    2. Just bought the drop cloth can't wait to cut and tuck tomorrow. Thanks so much. Your directions speak to me.

      Delete
  5. Will this work with a regular sheet?

    ReplyDelete
  6. Well, Anony...(both of you,)
    It depends on the size of sheet vs. the size of loveseat. After I wrote & posted this, I covered a second loveseat in my daughter's apartment. It was a smaller scale and I sure didn't need both huge dropcloths.
    I ended up using one and a half on hers.My loveseat is very fat & poufy. Hers is more traditional and smaller scaled.
    I would think you might need two sheets, but material-wise, I think any fabric you have would work. Good Luck!
    Thanks for stopping by!

    ReplyDelete
  7. How well do these stay on with use? I bought two chairs, on the smaller side which I needed in a tiny sitting room, but very comfortable and sturdy (and cheap, lol). The problem is the color is a bit whacky ... I thought it would work but it clashes horribly. I was going to buy slipcovers but oh my they are super expensive and would cost way more than the chairs.

    I don't sew, and think I could do this, but I don't want to have to redo it every time someone sits.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Beth, you didn't say what kind of chairs... straight back, over-stuffed, etc. The loveseat I covered is quite puffy giving me lots of places to stuff the fabric. That's HOW I keep the cover on... by stuffing the excess fabric down between the seat, sides and back. It stays on very well. I secured it with pins. Upholstery tacks would work better.
      Let me know how it works for you.

      Delete
  8. Love it! How did you do the bottom? I just love how it's ruffled.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Amy, when I replaced the seat cushions and wrapped the fabric over them, I tucked it in between the two to make them look like they were separately covered. I then folded the excess under the seat cushions and pulled the end back out and pleated it by hand... I hope I'm explaining it well enough.

      Delete
  9. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Thank you so much for this post!! I was looking for a true no sew way to cover an ugly arm chair in my office, and this was PERFECT!!!

    ReplyDelete
  11. This is so Awesome!! Thanks! I have a question. I'm covering an oversized leather club chair. Do you have an idea of what size drop cloth to use? Thanks!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Diane, I would think a smaller one would work... but there are several sizes in our big-box hardware store, so if you purchase the large one, just cut it down to fit.

      Delete
  12. She had the advantages of light touch and vitality work, in addition to the advantages of zero gravity. After two years, despite everything I have the seat and utilize it now and again on our gallery amid the short summer here in Wisconsin.
    recliner sale

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular Posts